SAREES AS USED IN FASHION

Silk Sarees in ancient timesIn the history of Indian clothes, the sari is traced back to the Indus Valley Civilisation, which grew throughout 2800-1800 BC around the western part of the Indian subcontinent. Sari draping leaves back, cleavage, and profile of belly bare while wearing stylish womens sandals. The origin of such exposing clothes can be credited to damp environment of the land. The earliest recognized representation of the sari in the Indian subcontinent is the statue of an Indus Valley priest using a drape.

Poetry from Ancient Tamil  such as the Silappadhikaram and the Sanskrit work, Kadambari by Banabhatta, explains females in elegant drape or sari. The ancient stone engraving from Gangaikonda Cholapuram in old Tamil scripts has a reference to hand weaving. In ancient Indian custom and the Natya Shastra which is an ancient Indian writing explaining ancient dance and outfits, the navel of the Supreme Being is thought to be the source of life and imagination, thus the midriff is to be left bare by the sari.

Other sources state that daily outfit included a dhoti or lungi (sarong), incorporated with a bust band called ‘Kurpasika’ or ‘Stanapatta’ and periodically a wrap called ‘Uttariya’ that might sometimes be made use of to cover the upper body or head. Where as the two-piece Kerala mundum neryathum (mundu, a dhoti or sarong, neryath, a shawl, in Malayalam) is a survival of ancient Indian clothes designs. The one-piece sari is a contemporary development, produced by integrating the 2 pieces of the mundum neryathum and nice womens shoes.

The Fabric Used in Saree also decides how you will look in a saree. For example, stiff cotton saris give heavy look so these are not suitable for plus size women. Fabrics such as Chiffons, Georgettes and Silk Saris are best outfit for voluptuous large size busty women to show off their voluptuous and curvaceous natural body figure sexier and more beautifully.

 

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